CBC Radio’s The House: Resettling refugees, supporting Canada’s kids | CBC Radio

CBC Radio’s The House: Resettling refugees, supporting Canada’s kids | CBC Radio
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CBC News: The House47:25Resettling refugees, supporting Canada’s kids

On this week’s show: Canada’s immigration minister discusses resettling refugees as one family shares their search for safety. An expert highlights the need to prioritize children’s mental health during the pandemic. Plus, a look at how Chrystia Freeland could address wealth inequality, a dive into Alberta Premier Jason Kenney’s drop in popularity and an exit interview with Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil. 47:25

Resettling refugees amid a pandemic

Politicians are cancelling flights between Canada and some sun destinations during the COVID-19 pandemic. But for some, boarding a plan is the only path to safety.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees says it resettled fewer than 23,000 refugees last year — the lowest number the agency has seen in nearly two decades — as the pandemic delays resettlement efforts. Those numbers have also dropped in Canada.

The House hears from one Canadian trying desperately to get his family to safety in this country and asks Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino what’s next for Canada’s resettlement plan. 

CBC News: The House14:17Resettling refugees amid a pandemic

Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Marco Mendicino says the COVID-19 pandemic has introduced obstacles to Canada’s refugee resettlement efforts — but the country is still committed to its status as a world leader in welcoming those fleeing persecution. 14:17

‘We run the risk of causing damage to a generation of kids,’ psychiatrist says

COVID-19 is taking a toll on everyone’s mental health, but how are kids holding up these days? 

House producer Emma Godmere checks in with Charlotte Waddell, a child and adolescent psychiatrist and the director of the Children’s Health Policy Centre at Simon Fraser University. Her research suggests kids’ mental health was already in jeopardy heading into 2020 — and that their needs could increase dramatically as the pandemic continues.

CBC News: The House5:34How are kids faring during COVID-19?

House producer Emma Godmere checks in with Charlotte Waddell, a child and adolescent psychiatrist and health policy expert, along with two families to explore how the pandemic is affecting children’s mental health. 5:34

Is Chrystia Freeland uniquely placed to tax the rich?

Before her political career, Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland wrote a book about economic inequality called Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else

Now Freeland is Canada’s finance minister, and her updated mandate letter tasks her with finding ways to address extreme wealth inequality. 

Is she uniquely placed to address growing inequality or will she run into pushback? The House asks Miles Corak, a professor of economics with The Graduate Centre of the City University of New York, whose research Freeland cited in her book.

CBC News: The House8:27Is Chrystia Freeland uniquely placed to tax the rich?

Economist Miles Corak discusses whether the government is being ambitious enough with its plan to tackle wealth inequality. 8:27

Jason Kenney’s very long year

It’s just one month old, but 2021 has already been a long year for Alberta Premier Jason Kenney. Between MLA travel scandals, vaccine shortages and the cancellation of the Keystone XL pipeline, the hits just keep coming.

But the premier’s troubles started before this year. Kenney’s popularity has been dropping for months — particularly when it comes to his handling of the pandemic. 

So how did he get here? CBC Alberta’s network producer Jennifer Keene reports from Calgary.

CBC News: The House7:08Jason Kenney’s very long year

CBC Alberta’s network producer Jennifer Keene outlines how the past year has gone from bad to worse for Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, as his poll numbers sink in the face of MLA travel scandals, his handling of COVID-19 and the Keystone XL pipeline cancellation. 7:08

Exit interview with Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil

The Nova Scotia Liberals will soon select a new leader to become the 29th premier of the province. 

Outgoing Premier Stephen McNeil, who has led Nova Scotia for eight years and held elected office for 17, joins The House to discuss a momentous and difficult year, his legacy and what comes next for his successor.

CBC News: The House8:44An exit interview with Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil is nearing the end of his 17-year career in politics — eight of which he spent in the premier’s office. He joins The House to reflect on his career and the tumultuous year that capped it off. 8:44



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